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Podcast: Dane Mitchell

Dane Mitchell

Post Hoc, 2019. Artist Dane Mitchell.

New Zealand National Pavilion, Biennale Arte, Venice, Italy.

Recorded live for Art Ache – 13.08.19

Podcast link HERE.

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

What if it’s a cell-tower disguised as a tree?

In Venice, Italy…

Known as the Olympics of art, the Venice Biennale is pretty much the ‘top’ for artists. New Zealand’s 2019 representative is Dane Mitchell, whose project delivers cryptic lists of the vanished, the lost, or the destroyed.

Mitchell’s work broadcasts a vast inventory of bygone things to locations throughout the
city via fake tree cell towers, providing smartphone access via hotspot which you can hear the lists.

At the Palazzina Canonica – the epi-center of the work, scrolling lengths of paper lists emerge from a printer placed high upon a structural frame, they cascade down settling in ripples on the floor, forming an elegantly minimal installation of all that which has been lost.

Dane Mitchell produces artworks and spatial experiences that investigate how systems of knowledge are constructed and practically applied.

He is known for intellectually agile work that isn’t immediately obvious or readable.

Through his practice, Mitchell tests how human beliefs and convictions exist in spaces between logic and perception. Operating on the threshold of logic, his work supports the existence of uncertainty, or instability, within rational understanding.

Listen to the podcasted interview via Art Aches Spotify.

Details of work:

Post Hoc, by Dane Mitchell.
The Palazzina Canonica, Riva dei Sette Martiri, and surrounding locations, Venice, Italy.
On until November 24th 2019.
For more information go to nz@venice.com

More information:

Artists website: Dane Mitchell
Interview by Aimée Ralfini
Thank you to Liquid Studios for supporting contemporary art journalism
Produced by Kelly Carmichael for Art AcheTM
All rights reserved.

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The Art of August

Wanda Gillespie Art Ache

The Art of August

Written for Verve Magazine by Aimée Ralfini.

Published 01.07.19

The light around this time of year is so beautiful, it’s frozen in twilight. Elongated shadows stretch across winter surfaces, like cold long fingers wrapping around exposed skin. If you’re up early and enjoy walking, you’ll likely catch the morning fog, still nestling in suburbia, reluctantly dissipating as the winter sun eases into the day.

This August’s visually stimulating activities are perfect for lovers of art and companionship. With the MAGS Art Show, the Waikato Contemporary Art Award, and the Art Ache Winter Billboards, there is plenty to see outside the usual gallery setting. However, if you’re in the mood for solitude, there are many fabulous exhibitions up around the city too. A few picks for this month are:

Wanda Gillespie Solo Show

Through her contemporary wood carvings Wanda questions the nature of reality. Using real and invented historical facts she creates her own world, the characters and artefacts of which form the body of her wok.

Opening at The Vivian Matakana late August

MAGS art show

The 6th MAGS art show kicks off on Friday 16th August. A must for anyone interested in seeing a vast range of artwork by both students and professional artists. All proceeds go to supporting the school. A fabulous evening out, with something for everyone to enjoy.

August 16th – 18th at Mount Albert Grammar School

Cat Fooks Sprung from the soil

Sprung from the soil is a translation from the German word Wahneinfall, meaning delusion intuition. For Fooks the phrase conjures up the heady, irresistible terrain of painterly spontaneity that exercises her imagination.

On until August 23rd at Anna Miles Gallery

Waikato Contemporary Art Award

This year the awards have been judged by renowned photographer Dr Fiona Pardington, who has selected 53 works by 51 artists nationwide. A lovely way to spend a beautiful sunny winters day, driving through the countryside to experience a selection of the best contemporary art New Zealand has to offer.

August 3rd to November 10th at Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato

Marie Shannon Love Notes Billboard campaign

Marie Shannon is one of New Zealand’s most singular and noted photographers. In this campaign, love notes shared between her and partner, (now deceased), have been photographed and changed into artefacts of memory, love and loss. Blown up on giant digital billboards like visual memorials around Auckland’s cityscape.

*Podcasted interview with artist at artache.com*

 

Source.

Verve is Auckland’s free lifestyle magazine. It’s a feast of local news & events, personalities, fashion, food, health & beauty, entertainment, travel, real estate and much more. Online publication.

To submit your art event for consideration please email us!

Widget image credit: Artist Wanda Gillespie.

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Podcast: Marie Shannon

Marie Shannon Art Ache

Marie Shannon – notes on love.

Aimée Ralfini chats with the artist about love, loss and how it feels to have something so explicitly private so publically objectified.

Recorded live for Art Ache – 15.07.19

Podcast link HERE.

Marie Shannon is one of New Zealand’s most singular and noted photographers. Art Ache presents works from her Love Notes (2005) series.

In this campaign, love notes shared between her and partner, artist Julian Dashper (now deceased), have been photographed and presented on black like visual memorials. Changing into artefacts of memory, love and loss.

Such personal content presented in such a highly public arena will undoubtedly engage emotions one would not expect to encounter whilst on the morning commute.

Details of work: On display 1st July–31st August 2019.
Located on LUMO Digital billboards in and around Auckland city. Locations will be changing weekly.
This week’s locations are 15-17 Sturdee St, 206 Victoria St West, and 319 New North Road, Kingsland. Keep an eye on Art Ache’s Instagram and website for location updates and other information.

Additional information:
Both artists are represented by Trish Clark Gallery.
Marie Shannon‘s survey exhibition is currently travelling the country, developed by Dunedin Public Art Gallery in 2017. Later exhibited at both Wellington’s Adam Art Gallery and Christchurch Art Gallery, Rooms found only in the home, is on display at Auckland’s Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery until August 25th.

Widget artwork: Marie Shannon Across the Water, 1988 – Courtesy of Trish Clark Gallery.

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Essay: Love Out Loud

ART ACHE Marie Shannon

MARIE SHANNON

LOVE OUT LOUD

An essay by Kelly Carmichael about Marie Shannons 2019 Digital Billboard campaign

Picasso famously declared “Sex and art are the same things”, and if you reflect on recent art history you might well agree. Indeed, untrammeled affairs and dangerous sexual frisson seemed to fuel the 20th-century avant-garde.

But what about love? What about art created not from tumultuous desire but instead from intimacy in all its different forms – romantic love, or the love between parent and child?

This is the subject of a 2005 photographic series titled Love Notes by artist Marie Shannon.

Moving around Auckland in July 2019 are electronic billboards featuring five images from the Love Notes series, tender communications between Marie Shannon and her late husband the artist Julian Dashper. Originally conceived as unique, intimately-scaled silver gelatin prints, a selection of photographs has been combined and vastly enlarged for this exhibition in the public realm.

With their handwritten messages marked out in simple, delicate lines on gently creased sheets of paper, the photographs convey a profound sense of intimacy. But this evocation of affection and tenderness is in jarring contrast to its public location – a billboard along some of the city’s busiest thoroughfares.

‘I love you and sorry for being grumpy’ reads one billboard, while at first glance the cluster of notes on another are more cryptic. People on the daily commute or those in the street see only the initials ‘I L Y’ repeated across several notes but meaning starts to fall into place thanks to a generous trio of kisses that finishes one, or the reassuring ‘always’ added to the end of another. These notes feel intimate and tell of the private shorthand between lovers, their hastily written but heartfelt abbreviation a code, a visible form of the minute gestures and behaviours that shape the vocabulary of emotional intimacy. Shannon’s work has long been intimate, her autobiographical practice embracing the moments and spaces of everyday life.

Artists, who understand the economics of attention better than most, have a long history of playing with scale to affect impact and understanding. High above the streets Shannon’s notes are vast, yet also vulnerable. Love Notes has been exhibited before – to the typically small and self-selecting audience of galleries, and on lightboxes in Wellington’s Cuba Street – but never so boldly as this. Reconfigured for this presentation, the collage of notes forms new synapses and explores the urban media-scape as a site for art.

In reclaiming these advertising sites as creative space, Shannon’s work becomes a poetic musing on connection and communication across the most publicly extreme of mediums. Vastly enlarged to billboard format and with their private messages now public, the work’s reading alters.

It may seem a small gesture, to take these notes and re-present them larger and in a different context, but changing their size disrupts their interpretation. The tender words of Shannon’s Love Notes give materiality to the vulnerability required to make a success of relationships and the love or rejection we might receive. It is a metaphor for the same vulnerability art-making demands.

Romance, like art, impacts the way we think and the way we see. Pursuing either brings uncertainty and risk. Strong personal emotion is often expressed behind closed doors but presenting the work like this renders these private communications monumental. ‘A whisper has become a shout’, the artist observes.

Written by Kelly Carmichael, July 2019.

Additional material:

Podcast with Marie Shannon.

Marie Shannon is represented by Trish Clark Gallery

Campaign press release.

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Art Ache’s winter campaign 2019

Marie Shannon Art Ache

It’s ok if you’re grumpy, we love you.

Even the darkest winter’s day can be made bright with a little art.

Art Ache’s kisses – 2019

This season Art Ache has two offerings of visual delight on display for all to enjoy. Artworks from Marie Shannon and Vincent Ward will be reaching towards your heart from various digital billboard locations throughout Auckland during July and August.

Marie Shannon is one of New Zealand’s most singular and noted photographers. Art Ache presents works from her Love Notes (2005) series.

In this campaign, love notes shared between her and partner, artist Julian Dashper (now deceased), have been photographed and presented on black like visual memorials. Changing into artefacts of memory, love and loss.

Such personal content presented in such a highly public arena will undoubtedly engage emotions one would not expect to encounter whilst on the morning commute.

A podcasted interview with the artist can be listened to here.

Vincent Ward is one of New Zealand’s most renowned film directors. For Art Ache, he presents Membrane (2012), an image from his underwater series.

Taking the artwork out of context completely changes its intent. The severe crops applied for the billboard medium re-present the work majestically within the city landscape. Rich in aquamarines but still mysteriously shrouded, the androgynous human form glistens like a jewel against winter’s grey.

Details of work: On display 1st July–31st August 2019.
Located on LUMO Digital billboards in and around Auckland city. Locations will be changing weekly.
This week’s locations are 15-17 Sturdee St, 206 Victoria St West, and 319 New North Road, Kingsland. Keep an eye on Art Ache’s Instagram and website for location updates and other information.

Additional information:
Both artists are represented by Trish Clark Gallery.
Marie Shannon‘s survey exhibition is currently travelling the country, developed by Dunedin Public Art Gallery in 2017. Later exhibited at both Wellington’s Adam Art Gallery and Christchurch Art Gallery, Rooms found only in the home, is on display at Auckland’s Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery until August 25th.
Vincent Ward is currently exhibiting a new series Loom at Trish Clark Gallery. On until July 20th.

About Art Ache:
Art Ache’s ongoing quest is to engage everyday New Zealanders with Art and artists in a meaningful and relevant way. Art Ache places the artist first and believes at the core of every happy healthy society is a strong connection with its cultural ambassadors. Art Ache Manifesto

Art Ache would like to thank the artist’s dealer Trish Clark and the team at LUMO for being innovative art lovers and making this campaign possible.

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The Art of July

Louisa Humphry Kaetaeta Watson Art Ache

The Art of July

Written for Verve Magazine by Aimée Ralfini.

Published 01.06.19

Planning on a mid-winter holiday somewhere in beautiful Moana Oceania?

It’s always nice to support the local community and bring home a treasure from your time away to memorialise your adventure. But where do you start? Here are some top tips from a range of experts, artists and gallerists working in the field of Pacific Art.

What is the top piece of advice you’d give to anyone wanting to purchase an artwork or artifact whilst on holiday in the Pacific region?

“Where possible try to buy from the maker, or to meet them. Learn about the artwork itself, what it means to the people who made it and how they use it or display it.” Dr Billie Lythberg (Specialist in Māori and Pacific art).

“Buy from reputable galleries and artefact/craft companies. Unfortunately, cheap imported craft replicas and poorly produced prints do exist. I recommend Bergman Gallery, Moana Gems Pearl and Art Gallery, The Print Room at Beachcomber Pearl Market, Island Craft, Henry Tavioni Craft, Mike Tavioni Craft.”  Ben Burgman (Director of Bergman Gallery, Cook Islands).

“I like to think all artists working in the Pacific are informed by the experience of living here. So the same applies as for purchasing any artwork, buy something you love, something that warms your heart every day you see it, long after the return home.” Deborah White: (Director of Whitespace Gallery, Auckland).

“My advice to serious buyers and collectors interested in purchasing quality artwork or artefacts while on holiday in Oceania is to go beyond the flea markets for more original pieces, and look at venues where you may actually meet the artist.” Nikki Mariner (Island-based Samoan artist and Director of Manamea Art Studio, Samoa).

“Try and find something made locally so try and find the maker. Have an idea what unique things are made from that island or village. Make sure it is made of natural materials.” Numangatini MacKenzie: (New Zealand based Cook Island artist).

What starting point would you advise to budget for?

“Both Cook Islands Craft and Contemporary Art Work can be purchased at all price points, from NZ$50 for small carvings or art prints to many thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate carved works or original paintings.” Ben Burgman.

“High-quality original artwork is incredibly affordable in New Zealand, by international standards, it is ridiculously underpriced. Works on paper can be as little as $500 and are easy to transport, ceramics even less.” Deborah White.

“It is difficult to pinpoint a starting point to budget for art purchases as prices vary hugely between different island nations, different artists and different types of art. Paintings in our gallery usually start at $300SAT and go up to $4000SAT.” Nikki Mariner.

“$50 will give you a range of options to buy small quality items.” Numangatini MacKenzie.

What is one of your most treasured artworks or artifacts from the Pacific region and why? 

“My favourite artworks are those made for me by friends. A plaited necklace with two shark’s teeth is a reminder from the incredible Rosanna Raymond to sink my teeth into projects and kaupapa and to be bold and resilient. Sharks teeth are symbols of protection throughout the Pacific, incorporated into adornments and regalia, and are also used to carve wood and to draw blood. My necklace fastens with a single cowry shell, its feminine shape a gentle reminder that the women in my life have got my back.” Dr Billie Lythberg.

“Lianne Edwards is a mid-career environmental artist of Irish/ Tongan heritage, her work is collected and shown internationally. I have one of her “Sea Kraits” a work made of swordfish bills, Tongan sennit lashing and plastic. It is aesthetically beautiful and a constant reminder of the vulnerability of our marine environment and the harm we are doing to sea life.” Deborah White.

“I would say my Ula Nifo (Samoan tooth necklace) is my most loved measina. I’ve worn it for every performance and activation since I was a young girl whether that be for Samoa Day at Kindergarten to an activation at Toi o Tāmaki (Auckland Art Gallery) with the Pacific Sisters. This measina is common throughout Samoa and you’ll find many wearing them for performances although they were once a symbol of status and wealth when made from whale teeth. These days there are many alternatives.” Katherine Atafu–Mayo.

“One of my most favourite artifacts is a mat I purchased in Fiji. I keep it in my car and proudly pull it out at the beach or the park or anywhere in between. It is getting worn down now so I’m excited to get another one in the future. I just returned from Hawai’i and bought a small weapon at a Hawaiian owned store repping traditional craft from Kanaka Maoli. Its 20cm long and has a tiger shark tooth lashed to one end and coconut string loop half way through and sharpened point on the Koa wood. It’s a working weapon, well made and another of my most treasured items.” – Numangatini MacKenzie.

Auckland winter staycation?

If you’re staying in the winter wonderland that is Auckland this season, fear not! There are plenty of local galleries exhibiting a range of works from contemporary Pacific artists, our experts recommend:

Of Water – John Pusateri at Whitespace Gallery, Newton

WWJD (What Would Jim Do?): 2 – Group show at Vunilagi Vou, Ōtāhuhu

Names held in our mouths –  Group show at Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, Titirangi

Awakening – Joana Monolagi at Objectspace, Ponsonby

Seeing Moana Oceania – Group show at Auckland Art Gallery, City.

Written by Aimée Ralfini for Verve Magazine.

Verve is Auckland’s free lifestyle magazine. It’s a feast of local news & events, personalities, fashion, food, health & beauty, entertainment, travel, real estate and much more. Online publication.

To submit your art event for consideration please email us!

Widget image artwork by: Louisa Humphry and Kaetaeta Watson. Courtesy of Te Uru Waitakere.

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The Art of June

The Art of June

Written for Verve Magazine by Aimée Ralfini.

Published 01.06.19

The Art of June gravitates around photography. With the Auckland Festival of Photography running from 31 May to 16 June, many galleries will be showcasing photographers. 

Photography is an exciting medium. Relatively new in terms of art history, it has progressed rapidly, especially with the advent of computer graphics, resulting in artworks that combine digital graphics and surface additions, challenging a viewers perception of the photographed image as ‘truth’ and blurring boundaries between photography, installation, painting, and performance.

HAYLEY THEYERS

Through her photography Hayley Theyers illuminates the spellbound. Using themes from her childhood, along with myths and fairytales familiar to us all Theyers often brings attention the portrayal of the female. Theatrical and whimsical in style, Theyers’s photography presents stories through a feminist lens tinted with Jungian psychology. The artist is exhibiting at Black Asterisk until June 16th as part of the Auckland Festival of Photography.

“I dreamed of finding a finger belonging to a witch in a box, on that night both my children had the same dream…  the following night, as I slept, a witch visited me and scratched the sole of my foot. A few days later, in an op-shop in a strange city, I heard a frog croak, where no frog was.”
– Hayley Theyers.

RICHARD ORJIS

Richard Orjis’s photography captures colourful idiosyncratic manifestations of holistic ritual involving flora and its cycles of growth and decay. Orjis’s sparkling and sensual photographs present young men adorned in ritualistic garb, bedazzling with exotic flowers, they represent imagined rites of passage, retribution and passing ceremonies.

Rich and alluring, Orjis’ work will be on display at Melanie Roger Gallery as part of the Auckland Festival of Photography until June 22nd.

LIYEN CHONG

Liyen Chong’s work moves between the captured image of a photograph and the surface upon which it is experienced. She uses her body within the frame to intersect a space like paint, once developed Chong then adds more depth with mixed-media. This tampering with the photographic surface rarefies the moment in time that a photograph captures by making each work one of a kind. Striking and elegant, Chong’s work can also be viewed at Melanie Roger Gallery.

JUSTINE VARGA

Justine Varga’s photography illustrates the extreme liberation of the photographic medium in that it is cameraless photography. The artist uses elements of the medium – along with heat and physical interaction to emphasise themes of embodiment and duration. Her bold and visceral works are often drawn on, scratched and weathered, creating a ‘Memoire’ of her interplay with the medium. Varga’s stunning works are on display at Two Rooms until July 6th.

KEVIN CAPON

Kevin Capon turns everyday items into confrontational portraits; a book taped to a wall, a branch from a rose bush, a close up of a tattooed hand with a missing finger – all of his subjects stand stark as statements within themselves. Documenting such common items as if they are curiosities (and perhaps they are the modern equivalent of) evokes broader real-world issues around our own societal truths, which can leave you feeling quietly unnerved. Capon’s work is on display at Sanderson Gallery in Newmarket until June 10th.

NEW  Junes Instagram Find

Following artists on Instagram is a great way to brighten up your feed or add some depth and intellectual inquisition to your day. This months discovery is New Zealand artist Ben Cauchi who is based in Berlin. With work that is hauntingly reminiscent of early photographic experimentation in photosensitivity, @ben.cauchi is well worth your insta-love.

NEW Arty Keepsakes

If you’re planning on an excursion to the Auckland Art Gallery this season­ – and I recommend you do, prepare to immerse yourself not only art but also in art merchandise, in particular, for the body. Tattoos, scarfs, pins, and patches are ways you can support the art gallery as well as align yourself with top-tier creative thinkers. It is especially exciting that, currently, the gallery’s main shows celebrate female artists; The Body Reborn is on until June 9th, Pacific Sisters: He Toa Tāera is on until July 14th, Guerrilla Girls is on until October 13th  and Frances Hodgkins: European Journeys on until September.

Written by Aimée Ralfini for Verve Magazine. Source.

Verve is Auckland’s free lifestyle magazine. It’s a feast of local news & events, personalities, fashion, food, health & beauty, entertainment, travel, real estate and much more. Online publication.

To submit your art event for consideration please email us!

Widget image credit: Richard Orjis. Golden Daze. Courtesy of Melanie Roger Gallery.

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The Art of May

Peter Hawkesby Art Ache

The Art of May

Written for Verve Magazine by Aimée Ralfini.

Published 06.05.19

There is no denying it, Winter is here. Jandals are out. Slippers are in. Images of European Springtime have begun to appear on Instagram feeds like the darling buds of May, serving to illustrate the vastness between the platform and our actual reality that we are miles away, staring down the barrel of winter.

With mobile screens providing little warmth, here is a selection of vibrant art exhibitions to warm your cockles this May.

Double The Pleasure at Anna Miles Gallery

Peter Hawkesby continues to provide pleasure for the arts district of Karangahapae Road by way of his ceramic works. These combine loosely referential objects finished in earthen glases with brightly spray-painted ceramic halos – as if paying homage to the materials found in this notoriously gritty and flamboyant urban locality. The group show also features artists Adrienne Vaughan and Richard Stratton and is on until May 25th.

 

May Trubuhovich at Masterworks Gallery

Nothing will cosy your heart, more than a tiny button badge of a chirping bird, against a cheery yellow backdrop. Masterworks gallery is exhibiting the much-coveted stitch-work of May Trubuhovich until May 11th. Her first exhibition of fine art outside a career in award-winning film and animation, Trubuhovich’s work is rich with drama, narrative and exquisite detail. These neat petite wearable artworks start at a minuscule $95.

 

Garden of Memories at Malcolm Smith Gallery

A group show curated by Giles Peterson, brings together heirloom and contemporary Pacific quilts by artists from across Asia and the South Pacific. The exhibition stokes its audience both educationally – and emotionally. Featuring quilt works by Shona Pitt, Sheena Taivairanga, Lisa Reihana, Vea Mafile’o, Reina Sutton, Lina Pavaha Marsh, and Ken Khun. The Garden of Memories is on until May 12th.

 

Nola Campbell at Tim Melville Gallery

Nola Campbell is part of Colour Field, an Aboriginal Group show at the Tim Melville Gallery.

Campbell’s work documents the country in which she lives via a visually arresting style of painting which talks to the intimate relationship she has with her land.

Raised in a traditional nomadic context, Campbell (originally Yurnangurnu) keeps the stories past and present of her land alive through her bold expressive brush strokes and vibrant colours. Fascinating, colourful and inspiring, Colour Field is on throughout May, until June 8th.

 

On Paper at Artis Gallery

Originals, screen-prints, woodcuts and photography, Artis Gallery presents a diverse selection of works on paper in this group show. From Emma Bass to Liam Barr, this is an exhibition guaranteed to have something for everyone. Running from May 21st –  June 9th,  the line-up also includes artists Aroha Gossage, Nigel Brown, Bridget Bidwill, Fatu Feu’u, Weston Frizzell and Michael Smither.

Source.

Verve is Auckland’s free lifestyle magazine. It’s a feast of local news & events, personalities, fashion, food, health & beauty, entertainment, travel, real estate and much more. Online publication.

To submit your art event for consideration please email us!

Widget image credit: Artist Peter Hawkesby from Anna Miles Gallery.

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The Art of April

Art Ache Verve April 2019

The Art of April

Written for Verve Magazine by Aimée Ralfini.

Published 01.04.19

So many artists, so many galleries, all over the country, all over the world. We are a nomadic bunch and tend to travel around the country — who can blame us? It’s so beautiful here. For the Art of April, let’s take a closer look at some of the galleries and artists one might chance upon outside of Auckland and Aotearoa.

From China

With galleries in both Shanghai and Hong Kong Leo Gallery is respected for being a progressive force in nurturing young and representing established contemporary artists. It’s worth familiarizing yourself with the stunningly bold paintings of Tan Ping, who is regarded as the leading figure of Chinese abstract art, or the equally arresting works of Huang Yan as seen above.

 

From Waikato

Hamilton is becoming increasingly glamorous, due in part to newly established Weasel Gallery. Located on the main strip of Victoria Street, Weasel showcases the work of Telly Tuita amongst others. Tuita’s photographic work features a complex mix of cultural iconography from brightly coloured practical items, trade packaging and mythical figures through to references from Tonga’s colonial history.

From Australia

East Sydney’s Dominik Mersch Gallery aims to exhibit work that has an enduring impact aesthetically and conceptually. Such as the work of Isidro Blasco, who combines architecture, photography and installation to explore themes of vision and perception in relation to physical experience.

Galerie Pompom and Egg and Dart galleries both hail from earlier artist-run incarnations. Between them they present a bevy of delicious artworks from their combined stables, notably the fascinating portraits of Sydney based Andrew Sullivan and the petite visceral works of draped glass by Gabrielle Adamik.

From Hobart in Tasmania, Michael Bugelli Gallery functions part house museum, part contemporary gallery and part event site. In theme with this multidisciplinary space the gallery supports Kai Wasikowski – a multidisciplinary artist. Wasikowski’s artistic practice explores the dichotomy between a simulated natural environment and the ethically riddled consumer materials used to create one.

From Hawkes Bay

Serving the Hawkes Bay region with the very best contemporary art since 2016, Parlour Projects hosts 2018’s Fulbright-Wallace Arts Trust Award winner Emma Fitts. Emma Fitts’ textile sculptural works are made from wools, linens, silks and cotton – materials with which we all connect to on a daily basis, evoking personal narratives for every observer.

From Wellington

Cuba Streets {Suite} Gallery presents the desolate urban nightscapes of Daniel Unverricht, whose oil paintings will resonate with anyone fond of the tranquil beauty that resides in empty parking lots and starkly lit industrial buildings at night.

Located on Victoria Street Millers O’Brien is the newest dealer gallery in central Wellington. Among their stable of artists is Erica van Zon, who uses traditionally craft-associated materials, such as embroidery, beading and tapestry, to create modern works inspired by memories and encounters such as the view from an aeroplane window.

Wellington-based play_station is an Artist Run Initiative boasting over 50 exhibitions since its inception in 2016.  Artist and facilitator Tyler Jackson’s work in-part consists of intensely coloured large wall-mounted relief work, made from industrial materials which have been artfully woven together to maximise the impact of light and colour.

If you’re interested in checking out any of these galleries and artists without leaving Auckland or the country, they will be participating in Auckland’s upcoming Art Fair on May 1st.

Source.

Verve is Auckland’s free lifestyle magazine. It’s a feast of local news & events, personalities, fashion, food, health & beauty, entertainment, travel, real estate and much more. Online publication.

To submit your art event for consideration please email us!

Widget image credit: Artist Telly Tuita. Courtesy of Weasel Gallery, Hamilton.

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Podcast: The Archives

Art Ache Podcast Archive

Artist Podcast Archive

200 local and international artist interviews from 2014-2018.

Recorded live-to-air via 95bFM.

 

From highbrow to mono-brow and everything in-between, Aimée Ralfini hosted Who Arted on 95bFM until late 2018, interviewing artists, writers and creative types every week.

If you are an artist looking for your podcast, please email Ricky and he will help you find it or send you the original. Podcast Archives ––> HERE

Podcast Archives ––> HERE